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July 14, 2015

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Posted: 14 Jul 2015 12:06 AM PDT

'Negotiating with Germany is a Waste of Time'

Posted: 13 Jul 2015 11:09 AM PDT

Kevin O'Rourke:

...I don't suppose that any other left wing party that may come to power in the future seeking to challenge the current European economic policy mix will be as feckless as Syriza. The lesson that they will draw from this debacle is: negotiating with Germany is a waste of time; be willing to act unilaterally, be willing to default unilaterally, have a plan for achieving primary surplus if you haven't already achieved it, have a hard default and euro exit (now possible, thanks to the Germans) option in your back pocket, and be willing to use it at the first sign of hassle from the ECB. A deal could have been done today that would have strengthened the Eurozone, but instead it has just become a lot more fragile.

'Janet Yellen’s Unusual Optimism'

Posted: 13 Jul 2015 10:32 AM PDT

Teresa Tritch of the NY Times editorial board:

Janet Yellen's Unusual Optimism: ...To my ears, most of Ms. Yellen's speech expertly laid out why the economy is not ready for interest rate increases anytime soon. Then, toward the end, she said that based on her views, she expected to begin raising rates "at some point later this year." ...
Granted, it takes time for the effects of an interest-rate move to be felt in the economy. So if the Fed thinks the economy is going to start overheating, say, next year, it would choose to raise rates before that. But I didn't hear any good reason in the speech to believe that a full-steam-ahead economy lies ahead. ...
And yet, Ms. Yellen's take is that a gradual process of steady improvement is underway that, if continued, could justify the start of rate hikes this year.
That is guarded optimism. But six years into an economic recovery that has been consistently disappointing, I find it hard to share even guarded optimism. ...
Ms. Yellen stressed, as she always does, that actual economic developments in coming months would determine when to begin raising rates. The question is whether more of the same fitful, inconclusive growth will count as reason to act or reason to wait.

Paul Krugman: The Laziness Dogma

Posted: 13 Jul 2015 09:34 AM PDT

The economy is no longer providing "good jobs to ordinary workers". Jeb Bush thinks that means workers are lazy:

The Laziness Dogma, by Paul Krugman, Commentary, NY Times: Americans work longer hours than their counterparts in just about every other wealthy country... Not surprisingly, work-life balance is a big problem for many people.
But Jeb Bush — who is still attempting to justify his ludicrous claim that he can double our rate of economic growth — says that Americans "need to work longer hours and through their productivity gain more income for their families."
Mr. Bush's aides have tried to spin away his remark... It's obvious from the context, however, that ... he was talking about ... the "nation of takers" dogma... — the insistence that a large number of Americans, white as well as black, are choosing not to work, because they can live lives of leisure thanks to government programs. ...
Where does Jeb Bush fit into this story? Well before his "longer hours" gaffe, he had professed himself a great admirer of the work of Charles Murray, a conservative social analyst most famous for his 1994 book "The Bell Curve," which claimed that blacks are genetically inferior to whites. What Mr. Bush seems to admire most, however, is a more recent book, "Coming Apart," which notes that over the past few decades working-class white families have been changing in much the same way that African-American families changed in the 1950s and 1960s, with declining rates of marriage and labor force participation.
Some of us look at these changes and see them as consequences of an economy that no longer offers good jobs to ordinary workers. This happened to African-Americans first, as blue-collar jobs disappeared from inner cities, but has now become a much wider phenomenon thanks to soaring income inequality. Mr. Murray, however, sees the changes as the consequence of a mysterious decline in traditional values, enabled by government programs which mean that men no longer "need to work to survive." And Mr. Bush presumably shares that view. ...
There's now an effective consensus among Democrats ... that workers need more help... Republicans, however, believe that American workers just aren't trying hard enough..., and that the way to change that is to strip away the safety net while cutting taxes on wealthy "job creators."
And while Jeb Bush may sometimes sound like a moderate, he's very much in line with the party consensus. If he makes it to the White House, the laziness dogma will rule public policy.

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