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June 20, 2015

Latest Posts from Economist's View

Latest Posts from Economist's View


'Shared Security, Shared Growth'

Posted: 19 Jun 2015 10:30 AM PDT

The last paragraph of a long essay by Nick Hanauer & David Rolf on Shared Security, Shared Growth:

... We must do more than just offer voters a new economic theory—we must draw a sharp contrast with conservatives by proposing bold new policies predicated on the economic primacy of the middle class. The Shared Security System is one such proposal. But more than just demonstrating an innovative solution to providing economic security that is adapted to the sharing economy, a bold new proposal like the Shared Security System would demonstrate progressives' unwavering and unequivocal commitment to the middle class—to the proposition that growth and prosperity come not from tax cuts for the rich, but from inclusive policies focused on creating a secure middle class. By establishing our twenty-first-century Shared Security System, we will usher in a new era of middle-class economic security, and by so doing also provide American businesses with the economic stability and certainty that they demand.

Paul Krugman: Voodoo, Jeb! Style

Posted: 19 Jun 2015 09:01 AM PDT

 Selling tax cuts for the wealthy with unrealistic promises about growth:

Voodoo, Jeb! Style, by Paul Krugman, Commentary, NY Times: On Monday Jeb Bush — or I guess that's Jeb!,... gave us a first view of his policy goals. First, he says that if elected he would double America's rate of economic growth to 4 percent. Second, he would make it possible for every American to lose as much weight as he or she wants, without any need for dieting or exercise.
O.K., he didn't actually make that second promise. But he might as well have. It would have been just as realistic as promising 4 percent growth, and considerably less irresponsible. ...
Mr. Bush ... believes that the growth in Florida's economy during his time as governor offers a role model for the nation as a whole. Why is that funny? Because everyone except Mr. Bush knows that, during those years, Florida was booming thanks to the mother of all housing bubbles. When the bubble burst, the state plunged into a deep slump... The key to Mr. Bush's record of success, then, was good political timing: He managed to leave office before the unsustainable nature of the boom he now invokes became obvious.
But Mr. Bush's economic promises reflect more than self-aggrandizement. They also reflect his party's habit of boasting about its ability to deliver rapid economic growth, even though there's no evidence at all to justify such boasts. It's as if a bunch of relatively short men made a regular practice of swaggering around, telling everyone they see that they're 6 feet 2 inches tall. ...
Why, then, all the boasting about growth? The short answer, surely, is that it's mainly about finding ways to sell tax cuts for the wealthy..., low taxes on the rich are an overriding policy priority on the right — and promises of growth miracles let conservatives claim that everyone will benefit from trickle-down, and maybe even that tax cuts will pay for themselves.
There is, of course, a term for basing a national program on this kind of self-serving (and plutocrat-serving) wishful thinking. Way back in 1980, George H.W. Bush, running against Reagan for the presidential nomination, famously called it "voodoo economic policy." And while Reaganolatry is now obligatory in the G.O.P., the truth is that he was right.
So what does it say about the state of the party that Mr. Bush's son — often portrayed as the moderate, reasonable member of the family — has chosen to make himself a high priest of voodoo economics? Nothing good.

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