Redirect


This site has moved to http://economistsview.typepad.com/
The posts below are backup copies from the new site.

March 4, 2015

Latest Posts from Economist's View

Latest Posts from Economist's View


Links for 03-04-15

Posted: 04 Mar 2015 12:06 AM PST

'Can Competition Fix Net Non-Neutrality?'

Posted: 03 Mar 2015 09:52 AM PST

Joshua Gans:

Can competition fix net non-neutrality?: Short answer: it isn't obvious that it can.
Let me back up a second and explain why I am revisiting this issue again. Tim Harford published an article a few days ago that took his masterful econsplaining skills to the issue of net neutrality. But in providing his characteristically clear exposition, he crystallised where many economists (including Tim) slip up on the issue of whether broadband competition would get rid of net non-neutrality and make net neutrality regulations redundant. ...
The problem here is that we believe that competition is designed to provide consumers with more of what they want. So if your claim is that they want fast and slow lanes to management network traffic, then moving from monopoly to competition won't stop that from happening. It will likely enhance it even if, at the same time, it delivers lower prices to consumers. Indeed, in my own work (that just appeared in the Journal of Regulatory Economics), I found that it could be a vehicle for that even if net non-neutrality is not just about network management but something more sinister — like content provider hold-up.
The broader argument that I have made many times is that, in fact, solving the main problem with net non-neutrality — content provider hold-up — can be done with net neutrality while using less intrusive pricing schemes and product design to solve network management issues. In other words, I think we can have our cake and eat it too and net neutrality regulation is a good place to start.
On the issue of broadband competition, there is a political economy reason why net neutrality regulations might turn out to be bad for this: they now provide an excuse to allow things like the Comcast-Time Warner merger to proceed on the basis that net neutrality regulations curb a negative effect of that. My argument here is that I am far from convinced that the two things are related. However, I guess we will see if the political economy issues assist the merger's regulatory chances. As Tim Harford noted, cable company stocks rose after last week's announcement by the FCC so things are not looking too good on that front.

'The Unfulfilled Promise of Tax Credits as Economic Policy'

Posted: 03 Mar 2015 09:52 AM PST

Nick Bunker at the WCEG:

The unfulfilled promise of tax credits as economic policy: The relative paucity of the modern welfare state in the United States is a well-known fact among researchers. Compared to rich countries in Europe, the United States spends far less on social insurance programs and other social programs such as education. But these large disparities decrease once the private-sector side of the U.S. welfare state is included in the analysis. Yale University professor Jacob Hacker calls this the "divided welfare state," where in many instances the U.S. tax code is now the main vehicle for social policy in retirement, college savings, and housing.
How well has this "submerged state" worked? At least in these three areas, the effectiveness of the tax code, via deductions and credits, is questionable. Consider the state of the private-sector retirement system in the United States. .... Or consider the submerged state approach to high college tuitions. ... The mortgage-interest tax deduction is another example of policy being run through the tax code. ...
To be sure, the creation of this network of tax credits and tax expenditures wasn't without reason. Political realities necessitated the use of the tax code to achieve these ends. And these programs have done real good. But as the evidence shows, they are far from optimal.
The record of using the tax code to do tasks traditionally associated with the welfare state is clearly mixed. At best, it works like a Rube Goldberg machine that attacks a problem by hoping that a chain reaction will do the job. At worse, the machine doesn't work for the broad majority of the population. The relevant question is now how to re-engineer it for future, more efficient use.

No comments: