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March 26, 2015

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Posted: 26 Mar 2015 12:06 AM PDT

'Fed Should Push Unemployment Well Below 5%, Paper Says'

Posted: 25 Mar 2015 01:09 PM PDT

Larry Ball tells the Fed to be very patient when it comes to satisfying its mandate to pursue full employment:

Fed Should Push Unemployment Well Below 5%, Paper Says: The Federal Reserve should hold short-term interest rates near zero long enough to drive unemployment well below 5%, even if it means letting inflation exceed the central bank's 2% target. That's according to Laurence Ball, economics professor and monetary policy expert at Johns Hopkins University...
Mr. Ball says the Fed could create more jobs by letting the unemployment rate fall lower. It should seek to push the rate "well below 5%, at least temporarily," he writes. That could help bring some discouraged workers to reenter the labor market, as well as help the long-term unemployed find work and involuntary part-time workers find full-time jobs, he said.
"A likely side effect would be a temporary rise in inflation above the Fed's target, but that outcome is acceptable," writes Mr. Ball... U.S. inflation has been undershooting the Fed's target for nearly three years.
Mr. Ball's view is not shared by many Fed officials...

The 'Audit' the Fed Crowd

Posted: 25 Mar 2015 11:24 AM PDT

Audit the Fed?:

The "Audit" the Fed Crowd, by David Andolfatto: Alex Pollock says that It's High Time to "Audit" the Federal Reserve. ...just the other day, Senator Rand Paul, a leader in "Audit-the-Fed" movement (a significant step down from his father's "End-the-Fed" movement) was making statements like this one:

"[An] audit of the Fed will finally allow the American people to know exactly how their money is being spent by Washington."

Of course, the Fed does not control how money is being spent by Washington. The Fed prints money to buy government securities. It sometimes extends loans against high-grade collateral. Everything you want to know about these purchases and loans is publicly available. ...

Let's be honest here. There is nothing new to discover in further auditing. This movement is motivated by what they perceive to be bad monetary policy. It doesn't even make sense to say we want to "audit" the Fed's policy because the policy is already transparent (which is what permits critics to label it "bad").

There is, of course, nothing wrong with critiquing Fed policy. Indeed, there are many economists working inside the Fed that critique various aspects of Fed policy all the time. And, as we all know, members of the FOMC can hold very different opinions ("hawks" and "doves"). Thoughtful critiques of policy should be welcomed. Policymakers and researchers at the Fed do welcome them.

Moreover, I'm all for full accountability. The Fed should be accountable to the American people--it is, after all, a creation of the American people through their representatives in Congress. But as I have said, the issue here is not about accountability. It is about a group of individuals who want to see their preferred monetary policy adopted. That's fair enough. I just ask that they be honest about their motives. It has nothing to do with audits or accountability.

'Anti-Keynesian Delusions'

Posted: 25 Mar 2015 09:14 AM PDT

Paul Krugman continues the discussion on the use of the Keynesian model:

Anti-Keynesian Delusions: I forgot to congratulate Mark Thoma on his tenth blogoversary, so let me do that now. ...
Today Mark includes a link to one of his own columns, a characteristically polite and cool-headed response to the latest salvo from David K. Levine. Brad DeLong has also weighed in, less politely.
I'd like to weigh in with a more general piece of impoliteness, and note a strong empirical regularity in this whole area. Namely, whenever someone steps up to declare that Keynesian economics is logically and empirically flawed, has been proved wrong and refuted, you know what comes next: a series of logical and empirical howlers — crude errors of reasoning, assertions of fact that can be checked and rejected in a minute or two.
Levine doesn't disappoint. ...

He goes on to explain in detail.

Update: Brad DeLong also comments.

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