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January 8, 2015

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Posted: 08 Jan 2015 12:06 AM PST

'Getting It Wrong on Disability Insurance'

Posted: 07 Jan 2015 02:01 PM PST

It didn't take Republicans long to begin their assault on Social Security:

Getting It Wrong on Disability Insurance, by Kathy Ruffing, CBPP: I've explained that a new House rule will make it harder to reapportion payroll taxes between Social Security's retirement and Disability Insurance (DI) trust funds to avert a one-fifth cut in benefits to severely impaired DI recipients in late 2016.  In a revealing statement, co-sponsor Representative Tom Reed (R-NY) says the change is designed to prevent Congress from "raiding Social Security to bail out a failing federal program."  He's doubly wrong.
First, far from "failing," DI has grown mostly in response to well-understood demographic and program factors like the aging of the baby boom, and the program's trustees have long anticipated the need to replenish the trust fund next year...  Second, DI isn't distinct from Social Security; it's an essential part of Social Security.
Social Security is much more than a retirement program.  It pays modest but guaranteed benefits when someone with a steady work history dies, retires, or becomes severely disabled. ...
Statements like Representative Reed's implicitly attempt to pit Social Security retirement and disability beneficiaries against each other. ...

The Mythical Confidence Fairy

Posted: 07 Jan 2015 10:29 AM PST

After harming the recovery from the Great Recession -- and making it harder for the unemployed to find jobs -- through austerity, blocking jobs bills, and standing in the way of additional stimulus measures, Republicans are trying to take credit for the recovery. They made things worse, and when they stopped doing harmful things, the economy improved and they want credit for that:

The new Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell, suggested earlier today that the Republican Party deserves credit for recent data showing that the economic recovery has picked up speed. ... Mr. McConnell is claiming credit for a recovery based solely on the fact that Republicans have just taken control of both houses of Congress...
Here's what Mr. McConnell said on the floor this morning:
"After so many years of sluggish growth, we're finally starting to see some economic data that can provide a glimmer of hope. The uptick appears to coincide with the biggest political change of the Obama Administration's long tenure in Washington: the expectation of a new Republican Congress."

That deserves ridicule. Republicans were terribly wrong about Federal Reserve policy, just as wrong about austerity and the confidence fairy, yet here they are once again telling us that the confidence fairy rather than the end of their awful policy is responsible for the recovery.

'Sachs and the Age of Diminished Expectations'

Posted: 07 Jan 2015 09:19 AM PST

Simon Wren-Lewis is "fed up":

Sachs and the age of diminished expectations: I do not normally talk much about the US economy, because there are so many others writing articles and posts that can do so with more authority. But I am getting increasingly fed up with people telling me that US growth disproves the idea that austerity is bad for you at the Zero Lower Bound (ZLB). Jeffrey Sachs just joins a long list.
Of course the proper way to tackle this is as Paul Krugman does. As he says other stuff happens (like a large fall in the US savings ratio in 2013), so you need to go beyond a single country and look at lots of data. However this might leave the impression that somehow the US case is unusual and does not fit a Keynesian story. In this respect I did a simple exercise...

After presenting his exercise -- he compares a counterfactual where there was no austerity to the actual austerity driven path for the US -- he concludes:

With recent US experience, there is no case against Keynesian analysis to answer. 
This suggests to me two things. First, lots of people are desperate to show that critics of austerity at the ZLB are wrong, and are prepared to make nonsense arguments to that end. This may be particularly true if you very publicly proclaimed the need for austerity in 2010 (note the co-author: HT John McHale). Second, it is a sad day when anyone thinks that 2.3% growth is "brisk" when we are recovering from a deep recession and interest rates have remained at the ZLB. It is so very dangerous when these diminished expectations become internalised by the elite.

As he says, we also need to look across countries, and he has presented lots of evidence on the harm austerity has done to the UK economy.

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