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August 31, 2014

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Posted: 31 Aug 2014 12:03 AM PDT

'Incarceration Society'

Posted: 30 Aug 2014 09:40 AM PDT

Dan Little:

Incarceration society: It is becoming increasingly clear that the criminal justice system is an important component of the system of race in the United States today. Michelle Alexander's important book The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness makes the case that the war on drugs and the war on crime have functioned disproportionately to incarcerate and control young black men in America's inner cities. ...

Nobel Warnings

Posted: 30 Aug 2014 08:47 AM PDT

I have interviews with Peter Diamond and Edmund Phelps available here and here, and an interview I did with Lars Hansen should be available later this week. All are from the Nobel Meetings in Economics at Lindau, Germany last week. But if you are itching for still more from the Nobel Laureates in economics (four of the five were not in Lindau), here is a set of interviews available at the IMF:

  • Global Warming by George A. Akerlof
  • Increasing Demand by Paul Krugman
  • Secular Stagnation by Robert Solow
  • Inclusiveness by Michael Spence
  • Inequality by Joseph Stiglitz

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Posted: 30 Aug 2014 12:33 AM PDT

August 29, 2014

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Paul Krugman: The Fall of France

Posted: 29 Aug 2014 04:26 AM PDT

Why didn't François Hollande reverse austerity policies in France?:

The Fall of France, by Paul Krugman, Commentary, NY Times: François Hollande, the president of France since 2012, coulda been a contender. He was elected on a promise to turn away from the austerity policies that killed Europe's brief, inadequate economic recovery... But it was not to be. Once in office, Mr. Hollande promptly folded, giving in completely to demands for even more austerity.
Let it not be said, however, that he is entirely spineless. Earlier this week, he took decisive action, but not, alas, on economic policy... Mr. Hollande ... was focused on purging members of his government daring to question his subservience to Berlin and Brussels.
It's a remarkable spectacle. To fully appreciate it, however, you need to understand two things. First, Europe, as a whole, is in deep trouble. Second,... France's performance is much better than you would guess from news reports. France isn't Greece; it isn't even Italy. But it is letting itself be bullied as if it were a basket case. ...
Why ... does France get such bad press? It's hard to escape the suspicion that it's political: France has a big government and a generous welfare state, which free-market ideology says should lead to economic disaster. So disaster is what gets reported, even if it's not what the numbers say.
And Mr. Hollande, even though he leads France's Socialist Party, appears to believe this ideologically motivated bad-mouthing. Worse, he has fallen into a vicious circle in which austerity policies cause growth to stall, and this stalled growth is taken as evidence that France needs even more austerity.
It's a very sad story, and not just for France.
Most immediately, Europe's economy is in dire straits. ... Meanwhile, Germany is incorrigible. Its official response to the shake-up in France was a declaration that "there is no contradiction between consolidation and growth" — hey, never mind the experience of the past four years, we still believe that austerity is expansionary.
So Europe desperately needs the leader of a major economy — one that is not in terrible shape — to stand up and say that austerity is killing the Continent's economic prospects. Mr. Hollande could and should have been that leader, but he isn't.
And if the European economy continues to stagnate or worse, what will become of the European project — the long-term effort to secure peace and democracy through shared prosperity? In failing France, Mr. Hollande is also failing Europe as a whole — and nobody knows how bad it might get.

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Posted: 29 Aug 2014 04:04 AM PDT

Repugnant Markets and Prohibited Transactions

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 09:21 AM PDT

There seems to be a problem with embedding this video -- it's here:

Repugnant Markets and Prohibited Transactions

When Do We Start Calling This 'The Greater Depression'?

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 07:18 AM PDT

Brad DeLong:

When Do We Start Calling This "The Greater Depression"?: We started by calling it the financial crisis of 2007. Then it became the financial crisis of 2008. Next it was the downturn of 2009-2009. By the middle of 2009 it was clearly the biggest thing since the 1930s, and acquired the name of "The Great Recession". By the end of 2009 the business cycle trough had been passed, and people breathed a sigh of relief: "The Great Recession" would be its stable name–we would not have to change its name again, and move on to labels containing the D-word.
But we breathed our sigh of relief too soon..., the United States did not experience a rapid V-shaped recovery carrying it back to the previous growth trend of potential output. ...
Things have been even worse in Europe. The Eurozone experienced not recovery but renewed recession with a second-wave downturn starting in 2010...
Cumulative output losses relative to the 1995-2007 trends now stand at 78% of a year's GDP for the United States, and at 60% of a year's GDP for the Eurozone. These are extraordinary magnitudes of foregone prosperity...: nobody back in 2007 was forecasting ... the ... extraordinary decline in the rate of growth of potential output that statistical and policymaking agencies are now baking into their estimates. These magnitudes made me conclude at the start of 2011 that "The Great Recession" was no longer adequate: it was time to start calling this episode "The Lesser Depression". ...

August 28, 2014

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Posted: 28 Aug 2014 12:06 AM PDT

'On the Relationships between Wages, Prices, and Economic Activity'

Posted: 27 Aug 2014 07:00 AM PDT

This is from Edward S. Knotek II and Saeed Zaman of the Cleveland Fed:

On the Relationships between Wages, Prices, and Economic Activity: Labor costs and labor compensation have garnered considerable attention from economists in the wake of the financial crisis and recession. Across a range of measures, wage growth slowed sharply during the recession. Recently, wage growth has remained near historically low levels despite improvements in the labor market.
Subdued wage growth has been variously seen as both a cause and a consequence of the slow pace of economic growth and persistently low inflation rates. It also may have contributed to rising inequality. In some forecast narratives, a pickup in wage growth is viewed as a necessary condition for a stronger recovery and rising inflation. In others, it is a natural consequence of a tightening labor market.
This Commentary takes a closer look at the relationships between wages, prices, and economic activity. It finds that the connections among wages, prices, and economic activity are more akin to a tangled web than a straight line. In the United States, wages and prices have tended to move together, and causal relationships are difficult to identify. We do find that wages are sensitive to economic activity and the level of slack in the economy, but our forecasting results suggest that the ability of wages to help predict future inflation is limited. Thus, wages appear to be useful in assessing the current state of labor markets, but not necessarily sufficient for thinking about where the economy and inflation are going. ...

So even if wages do finally begin rising, policymakers shouldn't panic about inflation (wishful thinking).

Filling the Gap: Monetary Policy or Tax Cuts or Government Spending?

Posted: 27 Aug 2014 07:00 AM PDT

Simon Wren-Lewis (a bit technical):

Filling the gap: monetary policy or tax cuts or government spending: Suppose there is a shortfall in aggregate demand associated with a rise in involuntary unemployment in a simple closed economy with no capital. Do we try and raise private consumption (C) or government consumption (G)? If the former, why do we prefer to use monetary policy rather than tax cuts? ...

State Income Taxes Have Little Impact on Interstate Migration

Posted: 27 Aug 2014 07:00 AM PDT

From Michael Mazerov of the CBPP:

More Evidence That State Income Taxes Have Little Impact on Interstate Migration: The New York Times' Upshot blog has published a fascinating set of graphs of Census Bureau data on interstate migration patterns since 1900, bolstering our argument that state income taxes don't have a significant impact on people's decisions about where to live.
We plotted the same Census data, which shows which states do the best job of retaining their native-born populations, on the chart below, also noting which states have (or don't have) a state income tax.  Our chart shows that taxes have little to do with the extent to which native-born people leave their states of origin.
If Heritage Foundation economist Stephen Moore's claim (which other tax-cut advocates often repeat) that "taxes are indisputably a major factor in determining where . . . families locate" were true, states without income taxes would see below-average shares of their native-born populations leaving at some point in their lifetime, while states with relatively high income taxes would see the opposite.  But the graph shows no such pattern...

August 27, 2014

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Posted: 27 Aug 2014 12:06 AM PDT

A Reason to Question the Official Unemployment Rate

Posted: 26 Aug 2014 06:52 AM PDT

[Still on the road ... three quick ones before another long day of driving.]

David Leonhardt:

A New Reason to Question the Official Unemployment Rate: ...A new academic paper suggests that the unemployment rate appears to have become less accurate over the last two decades, in part because of this rise in nonresponse. In particular, there seems to have been an increase in the number of people who once would have qualified as officially unemployed and today are considered out of the labor force, neither working nor looking for work.
The trend obviously matters for its own sake: It suggests that the official unemployment rate – 6.2 percent in July – understates the extent of economic pain in the country today. ... The new paper is a reminder that the unemployment rate deserves less attention than it often receives.
Yet the research also relates to a larger phenomenon. The declining response rate to surveys of almost all kinds is among the biggest problems in the social sciences. ...
Why are people less willing to respond? The rise of caller ID and the decline of landlines play a role. But they're not the only reasons. Americans' trust in institutions – including government, the media, churches, banks, labor unions and schools – has fallen in recent decades. People seem more dubious of a survey's purpose and more worried about intrusions into their privacy than in the past.
"People are skeptical – Is this a real survey? What they are asking me?" Francis Horvath, of the Labor Department, says. ...

'Who Pays Corporate Taxes?'

Posted: 26 Aug 2014 06:51 AM PDT

Justin Fox

Who Pays Corporate Taxes? Possibly You: Who pays corporate income taxes? Just one thing's for sure: it's not corporations. ...
For a long time it was thought the owners paid the tax. That belief can be traced largely to a classic 1962 theoretical analysis by economist Arnold Harberger...
Harberger saw this as a bad thing. By taking money away from capital owners, the corporate income tax was depressing investment and distorting the economy. But for those more concerned with the distributional effects of taxation, Harberger's model at least showed the burden landing on people who were wealthier than average.
His theoretical model, however, assumed a closed economy... As the world's economies became more intertwined in recent decades, economists — Harberger among them — began constructing open-economy models that showed workers bearing a larger share of the burden. ...
So in the past few years there's been a determined attempt to answer the question empirically... Gravelle has a 2011 summary of this work, and her chief conclusions are that the results are all over the place and the most dramatic ones just aren't credible. But most of these studies do show some significant chunk of the corporate tax burden landing on workers, which is perhaps not yet conclusive but is really interesting.
Most public discussions of corporate taxes in the U.S., however, still ignore the possibility that workers might actually be the ones bearing the burden. ... Perhaps it's ... just that, if corporations pay lower taxes, individuals have to pick up the slack. And even if you understand tax incidence perfectly well, a direct tax is still more noticeable than an indirect one.

'Property Rights and Saving the Rhino'

Posted: 26 Aug 2014 06:51 AM PDT

Tim Taylor:

Property Rights and Saving the Rhino: South Africa is the home for 75% of the world's population of black rhinos and  96% of the world's population of white rhinos. There must be some lessons for conservationists behind those statistics. Michael 't Sas-Rolfes tells the story in "Saving African Rhinos: A Market Success Story," written as a case study for the Property and Environment Research Center (PERC).

The story isn't just about markets. In 1900, the white rhinoceros had been hunted almost to extinction, with about 20 remaining in a single game preserve in South Africa. The population slowly recovered a bit, and by the middle of the 20th century, there were enough to start relocating breeding groups of white rhinos to other national parks in South Africa, as well as private game ranches. In 1968, the first legal hunt of a white rhino was authorized.

But by the 1980s, Sas-Rolfes reports, a strange disjunction had emerged. In 1982, the Natal Parks Board had a list price for a white rhino of about 1,000 South African rands, but the average price paid by a hunter for a rhino trophy that year was 6,000 rands. Private game preserves were quick to take advantage of the arbitrage opportunity. The Natal Parks Board soon began auctioning its rhinos. In 1989, it was selling rhinos for 49,000 rand, but the average price to a hunter for a rhino trophy had risen to 92,000 rand. There were obvious questions about whether this system of raising and hunting rhinos was a useful tool from a broader environmental perspective.

But property rights and markets enter the story in a different way in 1991.
Before 1991, all wildlife in South Africa was treated by law as res nullius or un-owned property. To reap the benefits of ownership from a wild animal, it had to be killed, captured, or domesticated. This created an incentive to harvest, not protect, valuable wild species—meaning that even if a game rancher paid for a rhino, the rancher could not claim compensation if the rhino left his property or was killed by a poacher. . . . Recognizing the problems associated with the res nullius maxim, the commission drafted a new piece of legislation: the Theft of Game Act of 1991. This policy allowed for private ownership of any wild animal that could be identified according to certain criteria such as a brand or ear tag. The combined effect of market pricing through auctions and the creation of stronger property rights over rhinos changed the incentives of private ranchers. It now made sense to breed rhinos rather than shoot them as soon as they were received.
For a sense of how much difference these issues of property rights and incentives can make to conservation, consider the difference in populations between black and white rhinos. Sas-Rolfes explains: "Figure 2 shows trends in white rhino numbers from 1960 until 2007. Contrast those
numbers with the black rhino, which mostly lived in African countries with weak or absent wildlife market institutions such as Kenya, Tanzania, and Zambia. In 1960, about 100,000 black rhinos roamed across Africa, but by the early 1990s poachers had reduced their numbers to less than 2,500. . . . Unprotected wild rhino populations are rare to non-existent in modern Africa. The only surviving African rhinos remain either in countries with strong wildlife market institutions (such as South Africa and Namibia) or in intensively protected zones."
Rhino
A strong demand for rhino horn remains, and especially since about 2008, rhinos across Africa face a risk of illegal poachers. Here's a figure from the conservation group Save the Rhino showing the level of rhino poaching in South Africa:
Index
Along with the existing choices of "intensively protected zones"--which implies costly and not-very-corruptible protectors--and allowing for private game preserves, the other option is to seek to undercut the black market for rhino horn with a legal market. Other more controversial options discussed at the Save the Rhinos website include de-horning rhinos, to make them less attractive to poachers, and perhaps even allowing legal sale of these rhino horns, to undercut the prices paid to poacher. Rhino horns are made of keratin, similar to the substance in fingernails and hair, and the horn could be removed every year or two. There are strong arguments on both sides of allowing legal sale of rhino horn: perhaps rather than undercutting the illegal market, it might also make it easier for poachers to sell their illegally obtained rhino horn. In the end, given that South Africa is now the home to most of the world's rhinos, I suspect that South Africa will end up making the decision about whether to proceed with these options.

Those interested in how property rights might be one of the tools for helping to protect endangered species might also want to check this post on "Saving Jaguars and Elephants with Property Rights and Incentives" (December 19, 2011).  

August 26, 2014

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August 25, 2014

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Paul Krugman: Wrong Way Nation

Posted: 25 Aug 2014 12:33 AM PDT

Why have sunbelt states experienced faster job growth than other regions of the country?:

Wrong Way Nation by Paul Krugman, Commentary, NY Times: Gov. Rick Perry of Texas is running for president again. What are his chances? ... I have absolutely no idea. This isn't a horse-race column.
What I'd like to do, instead, is take advantage of Mr. Perry's ambitions to talk about one of my favorite subjects: interregional differences in economic and population growth.
You see, while Mr. Perry's hard-line stances and religiosity may be selling points for the Republican Party's base, his national appeal, if any, will have to rest on claims that he knows how to create prosperity. And it's true that Texas has had faster job growth than the rest of the country. So have other Sunbelt states with conservative governments. The question, however, is why.
The answer from the right is, of course, that it's all about avoiding regulations that interfere with business and keeping taxes on rich people low, thereby encouraging job creators to do their thing. But it turns out that there are big problems with this story..., wages in the places within the United States attracting the most migrants are typically lower than in the places those migrants come from...
So why are people moving to these relatively low-wage areas? Because living there is cheaper, basically because of housing. ...
In other words, what the facts really suggest is that Americans are being pushed out of the Northeast (and, more recently, California) by high housing costs rather than pulled out by superior economic performance in the Sunbelt. ...
So conservative complaints about excess regulation and intrusive government aren't entirely wrong, but the secret of Sunbelt growth isn't being nice to corporations and the 1 percent; it's not getting in the way of middle- and working-class housing supply.
And this, in turn, means that the growth of the Sunbelt isn't the kind of success story conservatives would have us believe. Yes, Americans are moving to places like Texas, but ... they're moving the wrong way, leaving local economies where their productivity is high for destinations where it's lower. And the way to make the country richer is to encourage them to move back, by making housing in dense, high-wage metropolitan areas more affordable.
So Rick Perry doesn't know the secrets of job creation, or even of regional growth. It would be great to see the real key — affordable housing — become a national issue. But I don't think Democrats are willing to nominate Mayor Bill de Blasio for president just yet.

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Posted: 25 Aug 2014 12:06 AM PDT

The Acemoglu-Robinson Critique of Piketty

Posted: 24 Aug 2014 03:43 PM PDT

Branko Milanovic:

My take on the Acemoglu-Robinson critique of Piketty: A couple of days ago Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson published a critique of Piketty's Capital in the 21st century. It is published here.  Because of the renown of the authors, perhaps more than because of its intrinsic quality, it is a review worth reading. I read it today and my brief reaction to the three main critiques by Acemoglu and Robinson is as follows. ...

[Travel day, squeezing this one in before hurrying to my next flight.]

August 24, 2014

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August 23, 2014

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A Conversation with Edmund Phelps

Posted: 23 Aug 2014 12:33 AM PDT

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Posted: 23 Aug 2014 12:06 AM PDT

'Three Conditions Must be Satisfied for Helicopter Money Always to Boost Aggregate Demand'

Posted: 22 Aug 2014 10:10 AM PDT

David Keohane at FT Alphaville:

Buiter on helicopter drops: Some further, further reading on Friday — a new paper from Citi's Willem Buiter, on why helicopter drops of money always work. From the abstract...:

Three conditions must be satisfied for helicopter money always to boost aggregate demand. First, there must be benefits from holding fiat base money other than its pecuniary rate of return. Second, fiat base money is irredeemable – viewed as an asset by the holder but not as a liability by the issuer. Third, the price of money is positive. Given these three conditions, there always exists – even in a permanent liquidity trap – a combined monetary and fiscal policy action that boosts private demand – in principle without limit. Deflation, 'lowflation' and secular stagnation are therefore unnecessary. They are policy choices.

The full paper is here.

Minority Mortgage Market Experiences During the Financial Crisis

Posted: 22 Aug 2014 09:51 AM PDT

Via Vox EU:

Minority mortgage market experiences leading up to and during the financial crisis, by Stephen L. Ross, Vox EU: The foreclosure crisis that followed the subprime crisis has had significant negative consequences for minority homeowners. This column reviews recent evidence in the racial and ethnic differences in high cost loans and in loan performance. Minority homeowners, especially black homebuyers, faced higher price of mortgage credit and had worse credit market outcomes during the crisis. This is largely due to the fact that minority borrowers are especially vulnerable to the economic downturn. ...

August 22, 2014

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Paul Krugman: Hawks Crying Wolf

Posted: 22 Aug 2014 02:34 AM PDT

The inflation "obsession" continues despite the fact that there is little evidence that inflation is likely to be a problem. Why?:

Hawks Crying Wolf, by Paul Krugman, Commentary, NY Times: According to a recent report in The Times, there is dissent at the Fed: "An increasingly vocal minority of Federal Reserve officials want the central bank to retreat more quickly" from its easy-money policies, which they warn run the risk of causing inflation. ...
That may well be the case. But there's something you should know: That "vocal minority" has been warning about soaring inflation more or less nonstop for six years. And the persistence of that obsession seems, to me, to be a more interesting and important story than the fact that the usual suspects are saying the usual things. ...
The point is that when you see people clinging to a view of the world in the teeth of the evidence, failing to reconsider their beliefs despite repeated prediction failures, you have to suspect that there are ulterior motives involved. So the interesting question is: What is it about crying "Inflation!" that makes it so appealing that people keep doing it despite having been wrong again and again? ...
Eight decades ago, Friedrich Hayek warned against any attempt to mitigate the Great Depression via "the creation of artificial demand"; three years ago, Mr. Ryan all but accused Ben Bernanke, the Fed chairman at the time, of seeking to "debase" the dollar. Inflation obsession is as closely associated with conservative politics as demands for lower taxes on capital gains.
It's less clear why. But faith in the inability of government to do anything positive is a central tenet of the conservative creed. Carving out an exception for monetary policy ... may just be too subtle a distinction to draw in an era when Republican politicians draw their economic ideas from Ayn Rand novels.
Which brings me back to the Fed, and the question of when to end easy-money policies.
Even monetary doves like Janet Yellen, the Fed chairwoman, generally acknowledge that there will come a time to take the pedal off the metal. And maybe that time isn't far off...
But the last people you want to ask about appropriate policy are people who have been warning about inflation year after year. Not only have they been consistently wrong, they've staked out a position that, whether they know it or not, is essentially political rather than based on analysis. They should be listened to politely — good manners are always a virtue — then ignored.

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Posted: 22 Aug 2014 12:06 AM PDT

Who Wins and Loses from Global Trade?

Posted: 21 Aug 2014 03:42 AM PDT

At MoneyWatch

Who wins and loses from global trade?: Why are most economists more in favor of free trade than the general public?
One reason may be that the models economists use to evaluate the impact of global trade often overlook some significant ways it affects jobs, income and social services. ...