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November 19, 2014

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Posted: 19 Nov 2014 12:06 AM PST

'The Structure of Obamacare'

Posted: 18 Nov 2014 05:21 PM PST

Paul Krugman says pundits need to do their homework:

The Structure of Obamacare: The big revelation of this week has been how many political pundits have spent six years of the Obama administration opining furiously about the administration's signature policy without making the slightest effort to understand how it works. They're amazed and in denial at the suggestion that it has the same structure as Romneycare, which has been obvious and explicit all along...
So, why was Obamacare set up this way? It's mainly about politics, but nothing that should shock you. Partly it was about getting buy-in from the insurance industry; a switch to single payer would have destroyed a powerful industry, and realistically that wasn't going to happen. Partly it was about leaving most people unaffected: employment-based coverage, which was the great bulk of private insurance, remained pretty much as it was. ... And yes, avoiding a huge increase in on-budget spending was a consideration, but not central.
The main point was to make the plan incremental, supplementing the existing structure rather than creating massive changes. And all of this was completely upfront; I know I wrote about it many times.
Look, I understand why the hired guns of the right have to act ignorant and profess outrage. But I really am shocked at centrists who apparently thought they could opine on the politics of health reform, year after year, without taking a hour or two to learn how the darn thing was supposed to work.

It seems to me this takes some degree of willful ignorance.

'How the Great Wage Slowdown Hurts Democrats'

Posted: 18 Nov 2014 11:16 AM PST

David Leonhardt argues "It's the economy, stupid." Do you agree? Or is it mostly about turnout? (These may not be independent factors):

How the Great Wage Slowdown Hurts Democrats: It's a simple rule: A weak economy makes for an unpopular president. President Obama is on course to become the fourth president of the last six to leave office with an approval rating well below 50 percent. Each of the previous three — both Bushes and Jimmy Carter — also had something else in common: Median family income fell during their presidencies.
The other two recent presidents, of course, were Bill Clinton and Ronald Reagan. Incomes rose while they were in the White House, and they left office with more Americans approving of their performance than not.
The most famous expression of this rule is still the one made famous by the 1992 Clinton campaign: It's the economy, stupid. ...
Ezra Klein ... wrote he was skeptical that slow wage growth was "driving elections in a very clear way." He instead suggested that structural political forces played a bigger role.
We live in a time of partisan polarization, with most voters loyal to their side. The Republicans have an advantage in midterm elections ... because their older, whiter coalition turns out... The Democrats have an edge in presidential elections ... because their coalition is larger, even if large parts of it vote only in presidential years. Mr. Klein was suggesting that these structural forces affect politics more than the state of the economy. ...

See also "Americans recognize slow economic recovery."

How Piketty Has Changed Economics

Posted: 18 Nov 2014 08:28 AM PST

I have a new column:

How Piketty Has Changed Economics: Thomas Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century is beginning to receive book of the year awards, but has it changed anything within economics? There are two ways in which is has...

I'm not sure everyone will agree that the changes will persist. [This is a long-run view that begins with Adam Smith and looks for similarities between the past and today.]

Update: Let me add that although many people believe that the most important questions in the future will be about production (as it was in Smith's time), secular stagnation, robots, etc., I believe we will have enough "stuff", the big questions will be about distribution (as it was when Ricardo, Marx, etc. were writing).

The Permanent Effects of the Great Recession

Posted: 18 Nov 2014 08:19 AM PST

At Moneywatch:

The Permanent Effects of the Great Recession

It was edited quite a bit, e.g. here is my opening for comparison:

Economists have long believed that shocks to aggregate demand are temporary. It might take time to return to the previous trend rate of output growth, years in some cases, but given enough time the economy will return to the pre-recession path. This graph from Nobel Prize winning economist Robert Lucas, for example, illustrates this point of view. The red line is trend economic growth, and the blue line shows how aggregate demand shocks cause the economy to deviate from the trend, and then return.
[Graph]
However, the experience of the great recession along with recent work such as "Potential Output and Recessions: Are We Fooling Ourselves?" from economists Robert F. Martin, Teyanna Munyan, and Beth Anne Wilson at the Federal Reserve call this into question. ...

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