Redirect


This site has moved to http://economistsview.typepad.com/
The posts below are backup copies from the new site.

October 6, 2014

Latest Posts from Economist's View

Latest Posts from Economist's View


Paul Krugman: Voodoo Economics, the Next Generation

Posted: 06 Oct 2014 12:24 AM PDT

Will Republicans "destroy the credibility of a very important institution"?:

Voodoo Economics, the Next Generation, by Paul Krugman, Commentary, NY Times: Even if Republicans take the Senate this year, gaining control of both houses of Congress, they won't gain much in conventional terms: They're already able to block legislation, and they still won't be able to pass anything over the president's veto. One thing they will be able to do, however, is impose their will on the Congressional Budget Office, heretofore a nonpartisan referee on policy proposals.
As a result, we may soon find ourselves in deep voodoo.
During his failed bid for the 1980 Republican presidential nomination George H. W. Bush famously described Ronald Reagan's "supply side" doctrine — the claim that cutting taxes on high incomes would lead to spectacular economic growth, so that tax cuts would pay for themselves — as "voodoo economic policy." Bush was right. ...
But now it looks as if voodoo is making a comeback. At the state level, Republican governors — and Gov. Sam Brownback of Kansas, in particular — have been going all in on tax cuts despite troubled budgets, with confident assertions that growth will solve all problems. It's not happening... But the true believers show no sign of wavering.
Meanwhile, in Congress Paul Ryan, the chairman of the House Budget Committee, is dropping broad hints that after the election he and his colleagues will do what the Bushies never did, try to push the budget office into adopting "dynamic scoring," that is, assuming a big economic payoff from tax cuts.
So why is this happening now? It's not because voodoo economics has become any more credible. ... In fact,... researchers at the International Monetary Fund, surveying cross-country evidence, have found that redistribution of income from the affluent to the poor, which conservatives insist kills growth, actually seems to boost economies.
But facts won't stop the voodoo comeback,... for years they have relied on magic asterisks — claims that they will make up for lost revenue by closing loopholes and slashing spending, details to follow. But this dodge has been losing effectiveness as the years go by and the specifics keep not coming. Inevitably, then, they're feeling the pull of that old black magic — and if they take the Senate, they'll be able to infuse voodoo into supposedly neutral analysis.
Would they actually do it? It would destroy the credibility of a very important institution, one that has served the country well. But have you seen any evidence that the modern conservative movement cares about such things?

Links for 10-06-14

Posted: 06 Oct 2014 12:06 AM PDT

Fed Watch: Is There a Wage Growth Puzzle?

Posted: 05 Oct 2014 12:18 PM PDT

Tim Duy:

Is There a Wage Growth Puzzle?, by Tim Duy: Is there a wage growth puzzle? Justin Wolfers says there is, and uses this picture:

WOLFERS

to claim:
This puzzle isn't entirely new, as the usual link between unemployment and the rate of wage growth has totally broken down over recent years.
​ The recent data have made a sharp departure from the usual textbook analysis in which a tighter labor market leads to faster wage growth, and subsequent cost pressures feed through to higher inflation.
But has the link between wage growth and unemployment "totally broken down"? Eyeball econometrics alone suggests reason to be cautious with this claim as the only deviation from the typical unemployment/wage growth relationship is the "swirlogram" of fairly high wage growth relative to unemployment through the end of 2011 or so. But is this a breakdown or a typical pattern of a fairly severe recession? While, it might seem unusual if you begin the sample at 1985 as Wolfers did, so let's see what the 1980-85 episode looks like:

PHILa100314

Same swirlogram. Compare the two recessions:

PHILd100314

Fairly similar patterns, although in the 80-85 episode there was more room to push down the inflation expectations component of wage growth. It would appear that in the face of severe contractions, wage adjustment is slow. Now consider the 1985-1990 period:

PHILb100314

Notice that wage growth is stagnant until unemployment moves below 6% - past experience thus suggests that we should not expect significant wage growth until we move well below 6% (you could argue the response actually began at 6.5%). Thus, it is premature to believe that there has been a breakdown in this relationship. So far, the response of wages is exactly what you should have expected in light of the 1980's dynamics. Which leads to two points:
  1. I am no fan of Dallas Federal Reserve President Richard Fisher. That said, he did not pick 6.1% out of a hat when he said that was the point at which wage growth has tended to accelerate in the past. That number fell out of his staff's research for a reason and surprises me not one bit.
  2. There is a reason the Fed picked 6.5% unemployment for the Evan's rule. There was absolutely no chance that that would be a meaningful number as far as labor market healing is concerned.
Consider now the sample since 1990:

PHILc100314

Note four points:
  1. Notice the minor "swirlogram" associated with the early-90's recession. Again, not a breakdown.
  2. After 1992, wage growth tends to move sideways until unemployment sinks below 6%.
  3. Since 2012, the relationship is as traditional theory would suggest, a point that is actually evident on Wolfer's chart as well. The R-squared on the regression line is 0.75. Although notice that again, as wage growth moves into that 2.5% range, it appears to once again move mostly sideways. No mystery - nothing we haven't seen before.
  4. Clearly, there is some noise in the relationship. You should be able to extract away from the noise and recognize that there is no sudden acceleration in wage growth.
Now let's take another step and consider the relationship between unemployment and real wages (note that the series ends in 2014:8 - we don't have the September PCE price data yet):

PHILf100314

The period of the Great Disinflation was generally associated with negative real wage growth. The period of the mid-90s to the Great Recession was generally associated with positive real wage growth. The swirlogram of the Great Recession is again evident, but notice that as unemployment approached the bottom end of the black regression line (R-squared = 0.65), real wage growth actually accelerated before returning to trend. I now have additional sympathy for firms that have complained in the past two years that they could not push wage growth through to higher prices. It does appear that real wage growth was faster than might be expected given the pace of economic activity and, by extension, the level of unemployment.
Oh - and real wage growth has reverted to the pre-Great Recession trend - pretty much exactly where you would expect it to be given the level of unemployment. Honestly, this one surprised me.
Which suggests that labor market healing has progressed much further than many progressives would like to admit. Many conservatives as well.
Which also means a lot of people are not going to like this chart.
And before you complain that the all-employee average wage data holds some great secret that is not in the production and nonsupervisory wage series (I have trouble taking seriously any sweeping generalizations of the business cycle dynamics of a series we only have through one business cycle), here is that version:

PHILg100314

Same swirlogram. Pretty much the same idea with wage growth heading right back to where you would expect prior to the great recession.
Bottom Line: Be cautious in assuming that this time is different. The unemployment and wage growth dynamics to date are actually very similar to what we have seen in the past. Low wage growth to date is not the "smoking gun" of proof of the importance of underemployment measures. There very well may have been much more labor market healing that many are willing to accept, even many FOMC members. The implications for monetary policy are straightforward - it suggests the risk leans toward tighter than anticipated policy.

Links for 10-05-14

Posted: 05 Oct 2014 08:01 AM PDT

No comments: