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August 6, 2014

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Links for 8-06-14

Posted: 06 Aug 2014 12:06 AM PDT

'The Missing Women in the Inequality Discussion'

Posted: 05 Aug 2014 08:27 AM PDT

This is from Caroline Freund and Sarah Oliver:

The Missing Women in the Inequality Discussion, by Caroline Freund and Sarah Oliver: Growing inequality of income and wealth has become a major global concern. In many countries inequality has been driven by weak earnings growth not only among the poor but also among groups across much of the income distribution, while earnings of the top 1 percent continue to rise dramatically.
A clear but often overlooked feature of this discussion is that the fantastic gains at the top of the distribution are almost entirely accruing to men. One reason it is overlooked is that income and wealth inequality are measured at the household level. But one person in the household typically earns and controls the money, and that person is almost always a man. The concentration of income and wealth in the hands of men should reinforce the call to undertake greater redistributive policies. ...
The growing concentration of wealth in the hands of a few is itself disturbing. That these few are almost all men makes it even more so.

'Republican Craziness Is Undermining the South’s Massive Keynesian Stimulus'

Posted: 05 Aug 2014 08:08 AM PDT

Ha:

Someone needs to tell Republicans that you're not actually supposed to govern according to the rhetoric used to gull the rubes.

More here.

'How Increasing Income Inequality Is Dampening U.S. Economic Growth'

Posted: 05 Aug 2014 07:26 AM PDT

The email letting me know about this said "Notorious commie group Standard & Poor's says inequality hurting economic growth":

How Increasing Income Inequality Is Dampening U.S. Economic Growth, And Possible Ways To Change The Tide: The topic of income inequality and its effects has been the subject of countless analysis stretching back generations and crossing geopolitical boundaries. Despite the tendency to speak about this issue in moral terms, the central questions are economic ones: Would the U.S. economy be better off with a narrower income gap? And, if an unequal distribution of income hinders growth, which solutions could do more harm than good, and which could make the economic pie bigger for all?
Given the decades--indeed, centuries--of debate on this subject, it comes as no surprise that the answers are complex. A degree of inequality is to be expected in any market economy. It can keep the economy functioning effectively, incentivizing investment and expansion--but too much inequality can undermine growth. ...
Our review of the data, as well as a wealth of research on this matter, leads us to conclude that the current level of income inequality in the U.S. is dampening GDP growth, at a time when the world's biggest economy is struggling to recover from the Great Recession and the government is in need of funds to support an aging population. ...

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