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August 29, 2014

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Paul Krugman: The Fall of France

Posted: 29 Aug 2014 04:26 AM PDT

Why didn't Fran├žois Hollande reverse austerity policies in France?:

The Fall of France, by Paul Krugman, Commentary, NY Times: Fran├žois Hollande, the president of France since 2012, coulda been a contender. He was elected on a promise to turn away from the austerity policies that killed Europe's brief, inadequate economic recovery... But it was not to be. Once in office, Mr. Hollande promptly folded, giving in completely to demands for even more austerity.
Let it not be said, however, that he is entirely spineless. Earlier this week, he took decisive action, but not, alas, on economic policy... Mr. Hollande ... was focused on purging members of his government daring to question his subservience to Berlin and Brussels.
It's a remarkable spectacle. To fully appreciate it, however, you need to understand two things. First, Europe, as a whole, is in deep trouble. Second,... France's performance is much better than you would guess from news reports. France isn't Greece; it isn't even Italy. But it is letting itself be bullied as if it were a basket case. ...
Why ... does France get such bad press? It's hard to escape the suspicion that it's political: France has a big government and a generous welfare state, which free-market ideology says should lead to economic disaster. So disaster is what gets reported, even if it's not what the numbers say.
And Mr. Hollande, even though he leads France's Socialist Party, appears to believe this ideologically motivated bad-mouthing. Worse, he has fallen into a vicious circle in which austerity policies cause growth to stall, and this stalled growth is taken as evidence that France needs even more austerity.
It's a very sad story, and not just for France.
Most immediately, Europe's economy is in dire straits. ... Meanwhile, Germany is incorrigible. Its official response to the shake-up in France was a declaration that "there is no contradiction between consolidation and growth" — hey, never mind the experience of the past four years, we still believe that austerity is expansionary.
So Europe desperately needs the leader of a major economy — one that is not in terrible shape — to stand up and say that austerity is killing the Continent's economic prospects. Mr. Hollande could and should have been that leader, but he isn't.
And if the European economy continues to stagnate or worse, what will become of the European project — the long-term effort to secure peace and democracy through shared prosperity? In failing France, Mr. Hollande is also failing Europe as a whole — and nobody knows how bad it might get.

Links for 8-29-14

Posted: 29 Aug 2014 04:04 AM PDT

Repugnant Markets and Prohibited Transactions

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 09:21 AM PDT

There seems to be a problem with embedding this video -- it's here:

Repugnant Markets and Prohibited Transactions

When Do We Start Calling This 'The Greater Depression'?

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 07:18 AM PDT

Brad DeLong:

When Do We Start Calling This "The Greater Depression"?: We started by calling it the financial crisis of 2007. Then it became the financial crisis of 2008. Next it was the downturn of 2009-2009. By the middle of 2009 it was clearly the biggest thing since the 1930s, and acquired the name of "The Great Recession". By the end of 2009 the business cycle trough had been passed, and people breathed a sigh of relief: "The Great Recession" would be its stable name–we would not have to change its name again, and move on to labels containing the D-word.
But we breathed our sigh of relief too soon..., the United States did not experience a rapid V-shaped recovery carrying it back to the previous growth trend of potential output. ...
Things have been even worse in Europe. The Eurozone experienced not recovery but renewed recession with a second-wave downturn starting in 2010...
Cumulative output losses relative to the 1995-2007 trends now stand at 78% of a year's GDP for the United States, and at 60% of a year's GDP for the Eurozone. These are extraordinary magnitudes of foregone prosperity...: nobody back in 2007 was forecasting ... the ... extraordinary decline in the rate of growth of potential output that statistical and policymaking agencies are now baking into their estimates. These magnitudes made me conclude at the start of 2011 that "The Great Recession" was no longer adequate: it was time to start calling this episode "The Lesser Depression". ...

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