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August 15, 2014

Latest Posts from Economist's View

Latest Posts from Economist's View


Paul Krugman: The Forever Slump

Posted: 15 Aug 2014 12:24 AM PDT

The risks from tightening policy too soon are much greater than the risks from leaving policy in place too long:

The Forever Slump, by Paul Krugman, Commentary, NY Times: It's hard to believe, but almost six years have passed since the fall of Lehman Brothers ushered in the worst economic crisis since the 1930s. ... Recovery is far from complete, and the wrong policies could still turn economic weakness into a more or less permanent depression.
In fact, that's what seems to be happening in Europe as we speak. And the rest of us should learn from Europe's experience. ...
European officials eagerly embraced now-discredited doctrines that allegedly justified fiscal austerity even in depressed economies (although America has de facto done a lot of austerity, too, thanks to the sequester and cuts at the state and local level). And the European Central Bank, or E.C.B., not only failed to match the Fed's asset purchases, it actually raised interest rates back in 2011 to head off the imaginary risk of inflation.
The E.C.B. reversed course when Europe slid back into recession, and, as I've already mentioned, under Mario Draghi's leadership, it did a lot to alleviate the European debt crisis. But this wasn't enough. ...
And now growth has stalled, while inflation has fallen far below the E.C.B.'s target of 2 percent, and prices are actually falling in debtor nations. It's really a dismal picture. ... Europe will arguably be lucky if all it experiences is one lost decade.
The good news is that things don't look that dire in America, where job creation seems finally to have picked up and the threat of deflation has receded, at least for now. But all it would take is a few bad shocks and/or policy missteps to send us down the same path.
The good news is that Janet Yellen, the Fed chairwoman, understands the danger; she has made it clear that she would rather take the chance of a temporary rise in the inflation rate than risk hitting the brakes too soon, the way the E.C.B. did in 2011. The bad news is that she and her colleagues are under a lot of pressure to do the wrong thing from [those] who seem to have learned nothing from being wrong year after year, and are still agitating for higher rates.
There's an old joke about the man who decides to cheer up, because things could be worse — and sure enough, things get worse. That's more or less what happened to Europe, and we shouldn't let it happen here.

Links for 8-15-14

Posted: 15 Aug 2014 12:03 AM PDT

'A Clear Connection Between the Rise in Incomes at the Very Top and Lower Real Wages for Everyone Else'

Posted: 14 Aug 2014 08:25 AM PDT

Simon Wren-Lewis:

...In the US the share of the 1% has increased from about 8% at the end of the 70s to nearly 20% today. If that has had no impact on aggregate GDP but is just a pure redistribution, this means that the average incomes of the 99% are 15% lower as a result. The equivalent 1% numbers for the UK are 6% and 13% (although as the graph shows, that 13% looks like a temporary downward blip from something above 15%), implying a 7.5% decline in the average income of the remaining 99%.
So there is a clear connection between the rise in incomes at the very top and lower real wages for everyone else. Arguments that try and suggest that any particular CEO's pay increase does no one any harm may be appealing to a common pool type of logic, and are just as fallacious as arguments that some tax break does not leave anyone else worse off. It is an indication of the scale of the rise in incomes of the 1% over the last few decades that this has had a significant effect on the incomes of the remaining 99%.   

'Data Mining Can be a Productive Activity'

Posted: 14 Aug 2014 08:25 AM PDT

Jennifer Castle and David Hendry on data mining

'Data mining' with more variables than observations: While 'fool's gold' (iron pyrites) can be found by mining, most mining is a productive activity. Similarly, when properly conducted, so-called 'data mining' is no exception –despite many claims to the contrary. Early criticisms, such as the review of Tinbergen (1940) by Friedman (1940) for selecting his equations "because they yield high coefficients of correlation", and by Lovell (1983) and Denton (1985) of data mining based on choosing 'best fitting' regressions, were clearly correct. It is also possible to undertake what Gilbert (1986) called 'strong data mining', whereby an investigator tries hundreds of empirical estimations, and reports the one she or he 'prefers' – even when such results are contradicted by others that were found. As Leamer (1983) expressed the matter: "The econometric art as it is practiced at the computer terminal involves fitting many, perhaps thousands, of statistical models. One or several that the researcher finds pleasing are selected for reporting purposes". That an activity can be done badly does not entail that all approaches are bad, as stressed by Hoover and Perez (1999), Campos and Ericsson (1999), and Spanos (2000) – driving with your eyes closed is a bad idea, but most car journeys are safe.
Why is 'data mining' needed?
Econometric models need to handle many complexities if they are to have any hope of approximating the real world. There are many potentially relevant variables, dynamics, outliers, shifts, and non-linearities that characterise the data generating process. All of these must be modelled jointly to build a coherent empirical economic model, necessitating some form of data mining – see the approach described in Castle et al. (2011) and extensively analysed in Hendry and Doornik (2014).
Any omitted substantive feature will result in erroneous conclusions, as other aspects of the model attempt to proxy the missing information. At first sight, allowing for all these aspects jointly seems intractable, especially with more candidate variables (denoted N) than observations (T denotes the sample size). But help is at hand with the power of a computer. ...[gives technical details]...
Conclusions
Appropriately conducted, data mining can be a productive activity even with more candidate variables than observations. Omitting substantively relevant effects leads to mis-specified models, distorting inference, which large initial specifications should mitigate. Automatic model selection algorithms like Autometrics offer a viable approach to tackling more candidate variables than observations, controlling spurious significance.

'Education Alone Is Not the Answer to Income Inequality'

Posted: 14 Aug 2014 08:25 AM PDT

Robert Kuttner:

Education Alone Is Not the Answer to Income Inequality and Slow Recovery: Our economy is now five years into an economic recovery, yet the wages of most Americans are flat. ... The top one percent has made off with nearly all of the economy's gains since 2000.  
Is there nothing that can be done to improve this picture?
To hear a lot of economists tell the story, the remedy is mostly education. It's true that better-educated people command higher earnings. But...
If everyone in America got a PhD, the job market would not be transformed. Mainly, we'd have a lot of frustrated, over-educated people.
The current period of widening inequality, after all, is one during which more and more Americans have been going to college. Conversely, the era of broadly distributed prosperity in the three decades after World War II was a time when many in the blue-collar middle class hadn't graduated from high school.
I'm not disparaging education—it's good for both the economy and the society to have a well-educated population. But the sources of equality and prosperity mainly lie elsewhere. ...

'The Gold Standard and Price Inflation'

Posted: 14 Aug 2014 08:25 AM PDT

David Andolfatto of the St. Louis Fed:

The Gold Standard and Price Inflation: Why doesn't the U.S. return to the gold standard so that the Fed can't "create money out of thin air"?
The phrase "create money out of thin air" refers to the Fed's ability to create money at virtually zero resource cost. It is frequently asserted that such an ability necessarily leads to "too much" price inflation. Under a gold standard, the temptation to overinflate is allegedly absent, that is, gold cannot be "created out of thin air." It would follow that a return to a gold standard would be the only way to guarantee price-level stability.
Unfortunately, a gold standard is not a guarantee of price stability. It is simply a promise made "out of thin air" to keep the supply of money anchored to the supply of gold. To consider how tenuous such a promise can be, consider the following example. On April 5, 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered all gold coins and certificates of denominations in excess of $100 turned in for other money by May 1 at a set price of $20.67 per ounce. Two months later, a joint resolution of Congress abrogated the gold clauses in many public and private obligations that required the debtor to repay the creditor in gold dollars of the same weight and fineness as those borrowed. In 1934, the government price of gold was increased to $35 per ounce, effectively increasing the dollar value of gold on the Federal Reserve's balance sheet by almost 70 percent. This action allowed the Federal Reserve to increase the money supply by a corresponding amount and, subsequently, led to significant price inflation.
This historical example demonstrates that the gold standard is no guarantee of price stability. Moreover, the fact that price inflation in the U.S. has remained low and stable over the past 30 years demonstrates that the gold standard is not necessary for price stability. Price stability evidently depends less on whether money is "created out of thin air" and more on the credibility of the monetary authority to manage the economy's money supply in a responsible manner.

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