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August 12, 2014

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Posted: 12 Aug 2014 12:03 AM PDT

'On Macroeconomic Forecasting'

Posted: 11 Aug 2014 01:08 PM PDT

Simon Wren-Lewis:

...The rather boring truth is that it is entirely predictable that forecasters will miss major recessions, just as it is equally predictable that each time this happens we get hundreds of articles written asking what has gone wrong with macro forecasting. The answer is always the same - nothing. Macroeconomic model based forecasts are always bad, but probably no worse than intelligent guesses.

More here.

'Celebrating Greenspan's Legacy of Failure'

Posted: 11 Aug 2014 08:23 AM PDT

Barry Ritholtz:

Celebrating Greenspan's Legacy of Failure: On this day in 1987, Alan Greenspan became chairman of the Federal Reserve Board. This anniversary allows us to take a quick look at what followed over the next two decades. As it turned out, it was one of the most interesting and, to be blunt, weirdest tenures ever for a Fed chairman.
This was largely because of the strange ways Greenspan's infatuation with the philosophy of Ayn Rand manifested themselves. He was a free marketer who loved to intervene in the markets, a chief bank regulator who seemingly failed to understand even the most basic premise of bank regulations. ...
The contradictions between Greenspan's philosophy and his actions led to many key events over his career. The ones that stand out the most in my mind are as follows...

Barry concludes with:

It's worth noting that, Greenspan's intellectual hero, Rand, also turned her back on her own philosophy, living off of Social Security and other government aid before she died of cancer in 1982.
In the end, a central banker cannot be both concerned with asset prices yet comfortable with collapsing bubbles. These are inherently contradictory beliefs. That is why Greenspan's tenure was both disastrous and fascinating.

'How Much is our Distant Future Worth?'

Posted: 11 Aug 2014 08:23 AM PDT

Cecchetti & Schoenholtz

How much is our distant future worth?: ...One new report estimates that – on the current path – perhaps $500 billion of U.S. coastal properties will be below sea level by 2100. ... We have plenty of other longer-run worries, too; like surviving a future asteroid hit (an event like the Tunguska blast of 1908 – perhaps 1,000 times more powerful than the Hiroshima bomb – probably occurs every 1,200 years) or managing radioactive waste (which can be toxic for tens of thousands or even millions of years).
How much should we care about such big threats that are potentially far off in time? How much ought we spend now to avoid a $1 worth of damage hundreds of years in the future? ... [explains how long-term discount rates are calculated] ...
Economists have tried several (more sophisticated) ways to measure very long-term discount rates... One well-known report, which applied a relatively low discount rate of 1.4%, called for rapid, large reductions in carbon emissions to limit future losses associated with climate change. A different analysis based on a relatively high 4.3% discount rate called for a carbon tax only about one-tenth the level implied by the low-discount rate analysis. Why? The low discount rate puts a great deal more weight on losses that are predicted to occur hundreds of years in the future.
Of course, it's not just about discount rates. It's about the scale of future losses, too. If policy actions today can prevent a calamity that threatens life on earth, then most people (including us) might judge the appropriate discount rate to be quite low because we would not weight the value of future lives any lower than their own. And there's at least one powerful reason to suspect that ... today's governments don't weight those future lives sufficiently: our distant descendants don't vote.

'Inflation in the Great Recession and New Keynesian Models'

Posted: 11 Aug 2014 08:23 AM PDT

From the NY Fed's Liberty Street Economics:

Inflation in the Great Recession and New Keynesian Models, by Marco Del Negro, Marc Giannoni, Raiden Hasegawa, and Frank Schorfheide: Since the financial crisis of 2007-08 and the Great Recession, many commentators have been baffled by the "missing deflation" in the face of a large and persistent amount of slack in the economy. Some prominent academics have argued that existing models cannot properly account for the evolution of inflation during and following the crisis. For example, in his American Economic Association presidential address, Robert E. Hall called for a fundamental reconsideration of Phillips curve models and their modern incarnation—so-called dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models—in which inflation depends on a measure of slack in economic activity. The argument is that such theories should have predicted more and more disinflation as long as the unemployment rate remained above a natural rate of, say, 6 percent. Since inflation declined somewhat in 2009, and then remained positive, Hall concludes that such theories based on a concept of slack must be wrong.        
In an NBER working paper and a New York Fed staff report (forthcoming in the American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics), we use a standard New Keynesian DSGE model with financial frictions to explain the behavior of output and inflation since the crisis. This model was estimated using data up to 2008. We find that following the increase in financial stress in 2008, the model successfully predicts not only the sharp contraction in economic activity, but also only a modest decline in inflation. ...

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