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July 14, 2014

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Latest Posts from Economist's View


Paul Krugman: Obamacare Fails to Fail

Posted: 14 Jul 2014 12:24 AM PDT

Why don't we hear more about the success of Obamacare?:

Obamacare Fails to Fail, by Paul Krugman, Commentary, NY Times: How many Americans know how health reform is going? For that matter, how many people in the news media are following the positive developments?
I suspect that the answer to the first question is "Not many," while the answer to the second is "Possibly even fewer"... And if I'm right, it's a remarkable thing — an immense policy success is improving the lives of millions of Americans, but it's largely slipping under the radar.
How is that possible? Think relentless negativity without accountability. The Affordable Care Act has faced nonstop attacks from partisans and right-wing media, with mainstream news also tending to harp on the act's troubles. Many of the attacks have involved predictions of disaster, none of which have come true. But absence of disaster doesn't make a compelling headline, and the people who falsely predicted doom just keep coming back with dire new warnings. ...
Yes, there are losers from Obamacare. If you're young, healthy, and affluent enough that you don't qualify for a subsidy (and don't get insurance from your employer), your premium probably did rise. And if you're rich enough to pay the extra taxes that finance those subsidies, you have taken a financial hit. But it's telling that even reform's opponents aren't trying to highlight these stories. Instead, they keep looking for older, sicker, middle-class victims, and keep failing to find them.
Oh,... the overwhelming majority of the newly insured, including 74 percent of Republicans, are satisfied with their coverage.
You might ask why, if health reform is going so well, it continues to poll badly. It's crucial ... to realize that Obamacare, by design, by and large doesn't affect Americans who already have good insurance. As a result, many peoples' views are shaped by the mainly negative coverage in the news... Still, the latest tracking survey from the Kaiser Family Foundation shows that a rising number of Americans are hearing about reform from family and friends, which means that they're starting to hear from the program's beneficiaries.
And as I suggested earlier, people in the media — especially elite pundits — may be the last to hear the good news, simply because they're in a socioeconomic bracket in which people generally have good coverage.
For the less fortunate, however, the Affordable Care Act has already made a big positive difference. The usual suspects will keep crying failure, but the truth is that health reform is — gasp! — working.

Links for 7-14-14

Posted: 14 Jul 2014 12:06 AM PDT

New Classical Economics as Modeling Strategy

Posted: 13 Jul 2014 03:00 PM PDT

Judy Klein emails a response to a recent post of mine based upon Simon Wren Lewis's post "Rereading Lucas and Sargent 1979":

Lucas and Sargent's, "After Keynesian Macroeconomics," was presented at the 1978 Boston Federal Reserve Conference on "After the Phillips Curve: Persistence of High Inflation and High Unemployment." Although the title of the conference dealt with stagflation, the rational expectations theorists saw themselves countering one technical revolution with another.

The Keynesian Revolution was, in the form in which it succeeded in the United States, a revolution in method. This was not Keynes's intent, nor is it the view of all of his most eminent followers. Yet if one does not view the revolution in this way, it is impossible to account for some of its most important features: the evolution of macroeconomics into a quantitative, scientific discipline, the development of explicit statistical descriptions of economic behavior, the increasing reliance of government officials on technical economic expertise, and the introduction of the use of mathematical control theory to manage an economy. [Lucas and Sargent, 1979, pg. 50]

The Lucas papers at the Economists' Papers Project at the University of Duke reveal the preliminary planning for the 1978 presentation. Lucas and Sargent decided that it would be a "rhetorical piece… to convince others that the old-fashioned macro game is up…in a way which makes it clear that the difficulties are fatal"; it's theme would be the "death of macroeconomics" and the desirability of replacing it with an "Aggregative Economics" whose foundation was "equilibrium theory." (Lucas letter to Sargent February 9, 1978). Their 1978 presentation was replete, as their discussant Bob Solow pointed out, with the planned rhetorical barbs against Keynesian economics of "wildly incorrect," "fundamentally flawed," "wreckage," "failure," "fatal," "of no value," "dire implications," "failure on a grand scale," "spectacular recent failure," "no hope." The empirical backdrop to Lucas and Sargent's death decree on Keynesian economics was evident in the subtitle of the conference: "Persistence of High Inflation and High Unemployment."

Although they seized the opportunity to comment on policy failure and the high misery-index economy, Lucas and Sargent shifted the macroeconomic court of judgment from the economy to microeconomics. They fought a technical battle over the types of restrictions used by modelers to identify their structural models. Identification-rendering restrictions were essential to making both the Keynesian and rational expectations models "work" in policy applications, but Lucas and Sargent defined the ultimate terms of success not with regard to a model's capacity for empirical explanation or achievement of a desirable policy outcome, but rather with regard to the model's capacity to incorporate optimization and equilibrium – to aggregate consistently rational individuals and cleared markets.

In the macroeconomic history written by the victors, the Keynesian revolution and the rational expectations revolution were both technical revolutions, and one could delineate the sides of the battle line in the second revolution by the nature of the restricting assumptions that enabled the model identification that licensed policy prescription. The rational expectations revolution, however, was also a revolution in the prime referential framework for judging macroeconomic model fitness for going forth and multiplying; the consistency of the assumptions – the equation restrictions - with optimizing microeconomics and mathematical statistical theory, rather than end uses of explaining the economy and empirical statistics, constituted the new paramount selection criteria.

Some of the new classical macroeconomists have been explicit about the narrowness of their revolution. For example, Sargent noted in 2008, "While rational expectations is often thought of as a school of economic thought, it is better regarded as a ubiquitous modeling technique used widely throughout economics." In an interview with Arjo Klamer in 1983, Robert Townsend asserted that "New classical economics means a modeling strategy."

It is no coincidence, however, that in this modeling narrative of economic equilibrium crafted in the Cold War era, Adam Smith's invisible hand morphs into a welfare-maximizing "hypothetical 'benevolent social planner'" (Lucas, Prescott, Stokey 1989) enforcing a "communism of models" (Sargent 2007) and decreeing to individual agents the mutually consistent rules of action that become the equilibrating driving force. Indeed, a long-term Office of Naval Research grant for "Planning & Control of Industrial Operations" awarded to the Carnegie Institutes of Technology's Graduate School of Industrial Administration had funded Herbert Simon's articulation of his certainty equivalence theorem and John Muth's study of rational expectations. It is ironic that a decade-long government planning contract employing Carnegie professors and graduate students underwrote the two key modeling strategies for the Nobel-prize winning demonstration that the rationality of consumers renders government intervention to increase employment unnecessary and harmful.

'Why Macroeconomists, Not Bankers, Should Set Interest Rates'

Posted: 13 Jul 2014 09:50 AM PDT

Simon Wren-Lewis:

Why macroeconomists, not bankers, should set interest rates: More thoughts on the idea that interest rates ought to rise because of the possibility that the financial sector is taking excessive risks: what I called in this earlier post the BIS case, after the Bank of International Settlements, the international club for central bankers. I know Paul Krugman, Brad DeLong, Mark Thoma, Tony Yates and many others have already weighed in here, but - being macroeconomists - they were perhaps too modest to draw this lesson. ...

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