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July 13, 2014

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Posted: 13 Jul 2014 12:06 AM PDT

Are Interest Rates Artificially Low? Nope.

Posted: 12 Jul 2014 12:15 PM PDT

Discouraging:

The Meme is Out There, by Paul Krugman: I just answered some questions for Princeton magazine, and among them was this:

Please comment on how artificially low interest rates have impacted the current value of baby boomers' retirement portfolios and should this be a consideration of the Federal Reserve?

I don't blame the editor, who after all isn't supposed to be an economist. But what this must reflect is what people are hearing on the financial news; I'm pretty sure that a lot of people think that all the experts regard interest rates as "artificially low", and have no idea that to the extent that such a notion makes any sense at all — which is to say in terms of the Wicksellian natural rate — interest rates are too high, not too low.

'The Collapse of the French Assignat and Its Link to Virtual Currencies Today'

Posted: 12 Jul 2014 10:03 AM PDT

In case you missed this in links, I thought it was interesting:

Crisis Chronicles: The Collapse of the French Assignat and Its Link to Virtual Currencies Today, by James Narron and David Skeie, Liberty Street Economics: In the late 1700s, France ran a persistent deficit and by the late 1780s struggled with how to balance the budget and pay down the debt. After heated debate, the National Assembly elected to issue a paper currency bearing an attractive 3 percent interest rate, secured by the finest French real estate to be confiscated from the clergy. Assignats were first issued in December 1789 and initially were a boon to the economy. Yet while the first issues brought prosperity, subsequent issues led to stagnation and misery. In this edition of Crisis Chronicles, we review how fiat money inflation in France caused the collapse of the French assignat and describe some interesting parallels between the politics of French government finance in the late 1700s and more recent fiscal crises.

Remembering John Law and the Mississippi Bubble
It was not without grave reservation that the National Assembly elected to pursue a new issue of paper currency. Some who spoke out against issuing the assignat recalled the wretchedness and ruin to which their families were subjected during John Law's tenure as head of French finance and the Mississippi Bubble of 1720. But there was also great political willpower against raising taxes of any sort and deficits were already high. So the only option was to turn to the printing press once again.
But this time, the National Assembly was convinced it would be different. The currency would be secured by confiscated church property...[continue reading]...

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