Redirect


This site has moved to http://economistsview.typepad.com/
The posts below are backup copies from the new site.

July 11, 2014

Latest Posts from Economist's View

Latest Posts from Economist's View


Paul Krugman: Who Wants a Depression?

Posted: 11 Jul 2014 12:24 AM PDT

Why has there been so much "hysteria over Fed policy"?:

Who Wants a Depression?, by Paul Krugman, Commentary, NY Times: One unhappy lesson we've learned in recent years is that economics is a far more political subject than we liked to imagine. ...
It's not that many years since the administration of George W. Bush declared that one lesson from the 2001 recession and the recovery that followed was that "aggressive monetary policy can make a recession shorter and milder." Surely, then, we'd have a bipartisan consensus in favor of even more aggressive monetary policy to fight the far worse slump of 2007 to 2009. Right?
Well, no. I've written a number of times about the phenomenon of "sadomonetarism," the constant demand that the Federal Reserve and other central banks stop trying to boost employment and raise interest rates instead, regardless of circumstances. I've suggested that the persistence of this phenomenon has a lot to do with ideology, which, in turn, has a lot to do with class interests. And I still think that's true.
But I now think that class interests also operate through a cruder, more direct channel. Quite simply, easy-money policies, while they may help the economy as a whole, are directly detrimental to people who get a lot of their income from bonds and other interest-paying assets — and this mainly means the very wealthy, in particular the top 0.01 percent. ...
Complaints about low interest rates are usually framed in terms of the harm being done to retired Americans living on the interest from their CDs. But the interest receipts of older Americans go mainly to a small and relatively affluent minority..., and it surely explains a lot of the hysteria over Fed policy. The rich ... ensure that there are always plenty of supposed experts eager to find justifications for this attitude. Hence sadomonetarism.
Which brings me back to the politicization of economics.
Before the financial crisis, many central bankers and economists were, it's now clear, living in a fantasy world, imagining themselves to be technocrats insulated from the political fray. ...
It turns out, however, that using monetary policy to fight depression, while in the interest of the vast majority of Americans, isn't in the interest of a small, wealthy minority. And, as a result, monetary policy is as bound up in class and ideological conflict as tax policy.
The truth is that in a society as unequal and polarized as ours has become, almost everything is political. Get used to it.

Links for 7-11-14

Posted: 11 Jul 2014 12:06 AM PDT

'In Search of Search Theory'

Posted: 10 Jul 2014 10:53 AM PDT

John Quiggin:

In search of search theory: This is going to be a long and wonkish post, so I'll just give the dot-point summary here, and let those interested read on below the fold, for the explanations and qualifications.
* The dominant model of unemployment, in academic macroeconomics at least, is based on the idea that unemployment can best be modelled in terms of workers searching for jobs, and remaining unemployed until they find a good match with an employer
* The efficiency of job search and matching has been massively increased by the Internet, so, if unemployment is mainly explained by search, it should have fallen steadily over the past 20 years.
* Obviously, this hasn't happened, but economists seem to have ignored this fact or at least not worried too much about it
* The fact that search models are more popular than ever is yet more evidence that academic macroeconomics is in a bad way ...

Fed Explores Overhaul of Its Target Interest Rate

Posted: 10 Jul 2014 10:52 AM PDT

Robin Harding reports:

Fed explores overhaul of key rate: The US Federal Reserve is exploring an overhaul of the Federal funds rate – a benchmark that underlies almost every financial transaction in the world – as it prepares for an eventual rise in interest rates. ...
According to people familiar with the discussions, the Fed is could redefine its main target rate so that it takes into account a wider range of loans between banks, making it more stable and reliable.  ...
In particular, the Fed is looking at redefining the Fed funds rate to include eurodollar transactions – dollar loans between banks outside the US markets – as well as traditional onshore loans between US banks. Other closely related rates that it could include are those on transactions for bank commercial paper and wholesale certificates of deposit between banks.

No comments: