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June 26, 2014

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Posted: 26 Jun 2014 12:06 AM PDT

The Optimal Number of Immigrants

Posted: 25 Jun 2014 09:32 AM PDT

John Cochrane:

The optimal number of immigrants: Hoover's Peregrine asked me to write an essay with the title, "What is the optimal number of immigrants to the U.S?"  (Original version and prettier formatting here. Also a related podcast here.) My answer: Two billion, two million, fifty-two thousand and thirty-five (2,002,052,035). Seriously.
The United States is made up of three and a half million square miles, with 84 people per square mile. The United Kingdom has 650 people per square mile. If we let in two billion people, we'll have no more population density than the UK.

Why the UK? Well, it seems really pretty country and none too crowded on "Masterpiece Theater." The Netherlands is also attractive with 1,250 people per square mile, so maybe four billion. Okay, maybe more of the US is uninhabitable desert or tundra, so maybe only one billion. However you cut it, the US still looks severely underpopulated relative to many other pleasant advanced countries.

As you can see by my playful calculation, the title of this essay asks the wrong question. ...

'Speculation, Trading, and Bubbles'

Posted: 25 Jun 2014 09:32 AM PDT

For those who might be interested, an excerpt from a new book by José A. Scheinkman, Speculation, Trading, and Bubbles (with contributions by Sanford J. Grossman, Patrick Bolton, Kenneth J. Arrow, and Joseph E. Stiglitz):

 

'That Big Negative Q1 GDP Revision'

Posted: 25 Jun 2014 09:02 AM PDT

Jared Bernstein:

Whoa! Whassup With That Big Negative Q1 GDP Revision?: Yes, you read those headlines right: real GDP contracted at a 2.9% rate according to revised data released this AM. That's contracted, as in went down.
So, are we, like, back in recession (granting that a lot of people think we never left)?
Nope. That was a truly lousy quarter but it's highly unlikely to be repeated any time soon. The particularly bad winter weather played a role; both residential and commercial building were negative. Heavy inventory buildups in earlier quarters were reversed, which usually implies a positive bounce-back in coming quarters. Exports were revised down and imports up, so the trade deficit subtracted a large 1.5 points from the bottom line; that drag will likely diminish in coming quarters.
Health care spending, a strong contributor in earlier estimates of Q1 growth, went from contributing 1 percentage point to growth in an earlier vintage of Q1 GDP to subtracting 0.16 points in this update, suggesting earlier estimates of the pace of increased coverage were overstated. That doesn't mean they're not happening; it just means they'll be spread out over more quarters. [Update: check that--a colleague tells me that what's really happening here is that people didn't use as many services as first thought. I'll try to look further into this.] ...
Year-over-year—a good way to squeeze out some quarterly noise—real GDP is up 1.5%. That's better than the headline number, but it too is actually a weak number. The trend over the last two years is 2.1% growth... I don't believe today's revisions really signal a decline in that trend rate and most analysts expect coming quarters to clock in at 2.5-3%. ...

I still think that policymakers should revise their priors (downward), particularly given their tendency to brush off any bad news as temporary changes that will surely be reversed in coming quarters.

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