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February 20, 2014

Latest Posts from Economist's View

Latest Posts from Economist's View


'How Well Did Social Security Mitigate the Effects of the Great Recession?'

Posted: 20 Feb 2014 12:24 AM PST

I started blogging during the Social Security wars of the Bush administration. Looks like it's a good thing reason prevailed:

How Well Did Social Security Mitigate the Effects of the Great Recession?, by William B. Peterman and Kamila Sommer: Abstract: This paper quantifies the welfare implications of the U.S. Social Security program during the Great Recession. We find that the average welfare losses due to the Great Recession for agents alive at the time of the shock are notably smaller in an economy with Social Security relative to an economy without a Social Security program. Moreover, Social Security is particularly effective at mitigating the welfare losses for agents who are poorer, less productive, or older at the time of the shock. Importantly, in addition to mitigating the welfare losses for these potentially more vulnerable agents, we do not find any specific age, income, wealth or ability group for which Social Security substantially exacerbates the welfare consequences of the Great Recession. Taken as a whole, our results indicate that the U.S. Social Security program is particularly effective at providing insurance against business cycle episodes like the Great Recession.

Links for 02-20-2014

Posted: 20 Feb 2014 12:03 AM PST

'Forget the Minimum-Wage Job Losses: It's Government Cuts That'll GetYou Mad'

Posted: 19 Feb 2014 07:39 PM PST

Heidi Moore:

Forget the minimum-wage job losses: it's government cuts that'll get you mad, by Heidi Moore: ...Which is worse: 500,000 Americans out of work, or 2m?... 500,000 is an estimate of the number of jobs the country might lose if the minimum wage gets raised to $10.10 an hour, according to a controversial analysis released Tuesday by the Congressional Budget Office. ...
What about those 2m jobs? That's how much the economy will lose by 2019 because of federal budget cuts, as estimated by the Center for American Progress. And, well, I hate to break it to you, but Congress already voted on those last year, and it didn't spur one fired shot.
Budget cuts, also known as austerity, are the most damaging economic decision Congress has made since the financial crisis. Former Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke warned lawmakers several times that austerity measures would hurt the economy, but they largely ignored his warnings. Jobs lost to government budget cuts are part of the reason why the economy still looks so weak...
The cost of austerity doesn't stop at 2m jobs, either. There could be as many as 7 million jobs that are never even created because of Washington budget cuts, according to the Economic Policy Institute. Those 7 million jobs would be the difference between the unhappy economy we have now ... and an actual recovery.
So, here's the not-so-simple question: if everyone's so angry about losing 500,000 jobs while paying the average worker more per hour, where's the unstoppable outrage about the 2m jobs that already seem lost to austerity? ...

'The Rise and Fall of Cap-and-Trade'

Posted: 19 Feb 2014 08:48 AM PST

Jeff Frankel:

The Rise and Fall of Cap-and-Trade: ...the political tide on both sides of the Atlantic has been against "cap and trade" over the last five years. In the United States, the highly successful trading system for allowances in emissions of SO2 (sulfur dioxide) has all but died since 2012.  In the European Union as well, the Emissions Trading System was in effect overtaken by other kinds of regulation in 2013.
Cap-and-trade was originally considered a Republican idea.  Market-friendly regulation was pushed by those who thought of themselves as pro-market, rather than by those who thought of themselves as pro-regulation.  Most environmental organizations were opposed to the novel approach;  many of them thought it immoral for corporations to be able to pay for the right to pollute. The pioneering use of the cap-and-trade approach to phase out lead from gasoline in the 1980s was a policy of Ronald Reagan's Administration.  Its successful use to reduce SO2 emissions from power plants in the 1990s was a policy of George H.W. Bush's administration.  The proposal to use cap-and-trade to reduce SO2 and other emissions further was a policy of George W. Bush's administration ten years ago under, first, the Clear Skies Act proposed in 2002 and then the Clean Air Interstate Rule of 2005. (See Schmalensee and Stavins, 2013, pp.103-113.) ... Senator John McCain, had sponsored US legislative proposals to use cap-and-trade to address emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases responsible for global warming. ...
Republican politicians have now forgotten that this approach was ever their policy.  To defeat the last major climate bill in 2009, they worked themselves into a frenzy of anti-regulation rhetoric.  ... The Republican rhetoric successfully stigmatized cap-and-trade.  Schmalensee and Stavins (p.113) sum it up: "It is ironic that conservatives chose to demonize their own market-based creation."
This stance left in its place alternative approaches that are less market-friendly (Stavins, 2011)... The non-market alternatives, such as "command and control" regulation requiring that particular energy sources or particular technologies be used, are less efficient.    Nonetheless they are again the dominant regime.   ...
There is nothing inevitable or irreversible about the recent trend away from cap-and-trade.  ... Even in the US, where it began, there is still grounds for hope. ...

Why Is the Job-Finding Rate Still Low?

Posted: 19 Feb 2014 07:59 AM PST

From Liberty Street Econmics at the NY Fed:

Why Is the Job-Finding Rate Still Low?, by Victoria Gregory, Christina Patterson, Ayşegül Şahin, and Giorgio Topa: Fluctuations in unemployment are mostly driven by fluctuations in the job-finding prospects of unemployed workers—except at the onset of recessions, according to various research papers (see, for example, Shimer [2005, 2012] and Elsby, Hobijn, and Sahin [2010]). With job losses back to their pre-recession levels, the job-finding rate is arguably one of the most important indicators to watch. This rate—defined as the fraction of unemployed workers in a given month who find jobs in the consecutive month—provides a good measure of how easy it is to find jobs in the economy. The ... the job-finding rate is still substantially below its pre-recession levels, suggesting that it is still difficult for the unemployed to find work. In this post, we explore the underlying reasons behind the low job-finding rate. ...

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