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December 19, 2011

Latest Posts from Economist's View

Latest Posts from Economist's View


Paul Krugman: Will China Break?

Posted: 19 Dec 2011 12:34 AM PST

Uh-oh?:

Will China Break?, by Paul Krugman, Commentary, NY Times: Consider the following picture: Recent growth has relied on a huge construction boom fueled by surging real estate prices, and exhibiting all the classic signs of a bubble. There was rapid growth in credit — with much of that growth taking place not through traditional banking but rather through unregulated "shadow banking" neither subject to government supervision nor backed by government guarantees. Now the bubble is bursting — and there are real reasons to fear financial and economic crisis.
Am I describing Japan at the end of the 1980s? Or am I describing America in 2007? I could be. But right now I'm talking about China, which is emerging as another danger spot in a world economy that really, really doesn't need this right now. ...
The most striking thing about the Chinese economy over the past decade was the way household consumption, although rising, lagged behind overall growth. At this point consumer spending is only about 35 percent of G.D.P., about half the level in the United States.
So who's buying the goods and services China produces? Part of the answer is, well, us:... China increasingly relied on trade surpluses to keep manufacturing afloat. But the bigger story from China's point of view is investment spending, which has soared to almost half of G.D.P.
The obvious question is, with consumer demand relatively weak, what motivated all that investment? And the answer, to an important extent, is that it depended on an ever-inflating real estate bubble. ...
And there was another parallel with U.S. experience: as credit boomed, much of it came not from banks but from an unsupervised, unprotected shadow banking system..: in China as in America a few years ago, the financial system may be much more vulnerable than data on conventional banking reveal.
Now the bubble is visibly bursting. How much damage will it do to the Chinese economy — and the world? ...
For what it's worth, statements about economic policy from Chinese officials don't strike me as being especially clear-headed. In particular, the way China has been lashing out at foreigners — among other things, imposing a punitive tariff on imports of U.S.-made autos that will do nothing to help its economy but will help poison trade relations — does not sound like a mature government that knows what it's doing. ...
I hope that I'm being needlessly alarmist here. But it's impossible not to be worried: China's story just sounds too much like the crack-ups we've already seen elsewhere. And a world economy already suffering from the mess in Europe really, really doesn't need a new epicenter of crisis.

Links for 2011-12-19

Posted: 19 Dec 2011 12:06 AM PST

"The Darwin Economy"

Posted: 18 Dec 2011 02:04 PM PST

I am hosting a discussion of Robert Frank's The Darwin Economy at FDL (2-4 PST). The introductory post is here, and you are, of course, welcome to join in.

One theme in the book is that the debate between libertarians and progressives over government intervention in the economy is a false one. Robert Frank argues that libertarians ought to support government intervention to stop the "arms race" for positional goods since the race wastes resources without providing any benefit to those engaged in the contest. But the ideas are presented as correcting both libertarian and progressive views. One thing I want to ask is why he sees his ideas as standing in opposition to traditional ideas about market failure that many progressives use to justify government intervention rather than enhancing and complementing them.

Payroll Tax Cut in "Serious Doubt"

Posted: 18 Dec 2011 09:15 AM PST

I wonder if the puppeteers in the Republican Party regret what they have created now that they have lost control of the strings controling the actions of the groups they needed to win elections:

For Senate Tax Cut Stopgap, Odds in House Are Uncertain, NY Times: ...the Senate voted overwhelmingly on Saturday to extend a payroll tax cut for only two months, with the chamber's leaders and the White House proclaiming victory, even as they punted into the new year the issue of how to further extend the tax cut and unemployment benefits.
In an unusual Saturday vote, the Senate approved by an 89-to-10 vote a $33 billion package that would extend a payroll-tax holiday for millions of American workers, extend unemployment benefits and avoid cuts in payments to doctors who accept Medicare. ...
But House passage next week was thrown into serious doubt on Saturday afternoon, when a number of rank-and-file Republicans objected in a conference call with Speaker John A. Boehner, who tried to persuade them that it was good for their party, particularly the provision that would speed the decision process for construction of an oil pipeline from Canada to the Gulf Coast known as Keystone XL. ...
Republican leaders — but not necessarily their rank and file — had wanted a full-year payroll tax cut deal to try to inoculate themselves against accusations by Democrats, as they head into an election year, that they are against tax cuts for low- and middle-income workers. It will be up to Mr. Boehner to convince his members that extending the cut —  and at least appearing to work with Democrats even as they labor to unseat Mr. Obama and the Democrats who still control the Senate — will ultimately work in their political favor. ...

Obama and House Republicans seem to be in some kind of contest to see who can give the biggest political gift to the other side.

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